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Joyce Arthur, BSN

We are proud of the talented professionals who are making a difference in the lives of our patients each and every day. One such colleague is Joyce Arthur.

February 16, 2023
Joyce Arthur smiles while wearing blue hospital scrubs and a white lab coat.

Black History Month is a time to celebrate and recognize the contributions that have been made by Black Americans across the country and right here in Utah. At St. Mark’s Hospital, we are proud of the talented and dedicated Black healthcare professionals who are making a difference in the lives of our patients each and every day. One such colleague is Joyce Arthur, BSN, who works on our Med/Surg unit.

Joyce has been with St. Mark’s Hospital for two years and has already made a major impact on her floor and in her role. She started as a Charge Nurse just six months after joining the hospital team in February 2021, and her passion for nursing shines through in everything she does.

Joyce was born and raised in Ghana, West Africa, and came to the United States in 2008. She has lived in the U.S. ever since, eventually moving to Salt Lake City in 2020 to be with her husband, Fred, who is also from Ghana. Together they have a 4-year-old son, Maximus, and are expecting a baby girl this summer.

Joyce’s passion for nursing started when she was taking care of her grandmother in Ghana. She said, “I’ve always wanted to be a nurse. I’ve always had a passion for caring for people, especially older people. It started with my grandmother and that passion has carried over into my career.”

Joyce attended Kumasi Technical University in Ghana before traveling to Florida as part of an exchange program. She eventually earned her BSN from Clayton State University.

Back home in Ghana, Joyce notes that it was incredibly difficult to get into nursing school because they aren’t as widespread or available for prospective nursing students. “I thought maybe I should do something else. But when I came to the U.S. there was so much more opportunity,” she explained. “I started my healthcare career as a CNA and decided that ‘yes’ — this is what I want to do! Simply put, there is just so much opportunity in the U.S., especially opportunities to pursue a career in nursing.”

Joyce loves being a nurse because it allows her to help patients; to be a comforting presence during what can be a difficult time for them. “It’s my job to talk with them and let them know that it’s going to be ok,” she said. “That plays a huge role in their recovery.”

For Joyce, Black History Month is a time to be proud of her heritage and to celebrate the rich culture of Ghana. She said, “Being from Ghana, I have a lot of pride. I’ve met many people from the U.S. who have lived in Ghana or who have visited Ghana and it’s a point of pride to talk with them about my rich culture.” Joyce goes on to say, “In turn, I love being here in Salt Lake City. I feel comfortable and I feel accepted here. I celebrate this month with everyone.”

In celebrating her culture, Joyce also wants to raise awareness about the rates of high blood pressure in the African American community. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 54% of Black adults in the U.S. have high blood pressure. The condition, also known as the “silent killer,” increases an individual’s risk of heart disease and stroke.

“Being a nurse and through my research, I know that high blood pressure is a major threat to my home country of Ghana. We have lots of issues related to blood pressure,” she said.

Joyce hopes to one day return to her home country and use her experience and knowledge as a platform to help educate Ghanaians about the risks of high blood pressure. For now, she encourages her parents to participate in annual check-ups and go to the doctor if they suspect a problem.

Joyce is a valuable asset to St. Mark's Hospital and an inspiration to her nursing colleagues as well as the African American community.

“I love who I am and I love Utah,” Joyce said. “I enjoy getting to tell people about my culture, where I’m from and how I grew up. On my unit at the hospital, I’m the only Black woman — but I love it! I have all the support around me.”

Joyce is an example of what can be achieved with hard work, dedication, and passion. We are proud to have her on our team.

Published:
February 16, 2023
Location:
St. Mark's Hospital

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